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Los Angeles Workers' Compensation Attorneys

Lawmakers approve filing extension for workers' comp death benefits

Los Angeles readers who pay attention to issues concerning accidents at work may know that late last month, the California Senate approved a measure, which would provide more time for the families of deceased first responders to file for workers' compensation death benefits. Under the measure, the extension would apply to the families of workers who died from diseases connected to their work. The extention provides families 420 weeks from the date of injury, and up to one year from a work-related fatality.

The bill has not been universally supported, unsurprisingly. Opponents say the bill will end up costing the government more money. Governor Jerry Brown has opposed previous versions of the bill, but the most recent measure apparently addresses the concerns he expressed. It remains to be seen how the bill will fare. 

Workers' compensation death benefits are payments made to the spouse, children and other dependents of a worker who died from work-related injury or illness. The amount available to survivors of an injured employee depends on the total number of dependents. Benefits, according to the California Department of Industrial Relations, include reasonable burial expenses not going beyond $5,000 for injuries prior to January 1, 2013 and $10,000 for injuries on or after January 1, 2013.

Those who have questions about benefits after a fatality or who need assistance applying for such should contact an experienced workers' compensation attorney for advice and guidance. This is particularly important in cases where surviving dependants of a deceased employee run into problems or resistance in claiming what is due to them. 

Source: Los Angeles Times, "Senate OKs workers' comp claim extension for law enforcement survivors," Patrick McGreevy, April 28, 2014. California Department of Industrial Relations, "Workers' compensation benefits," Accessed May 30, 2014.  

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